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Honey Bees

There’s a big buzz at the farm over our bees.  Our honey bees provide important pollination to the farm’s vegetables, fruit trees, and flowers.   They are such diligent workers traveling great distances to collect pollen.  If it wasn’t for them, we wouldn’t have the beautiful displays annually at CFG.  More so, they collectively are responsible for much of our world’s food supply.    This very coexistence which we witness every year makes us dedicated to providing housing and habitat for honey bees.  With dwindling populations in the wild, CFG is committed to helping out the honey bee.  As an added bonus, we get to harvest golden honey which the kitchen uses to make yummy treats.

Some interesting tidbits about bees and honey:

  • Raw honey contains 22 amino acids, 27 minerals and 5,000 enzymes. Raw honey offers many nutritional benefits without the man-made chemicals found in many other forms of sweeteners.

  • An average hives produce 25 pounds of honey per year but some can produce up to 65 pounds per year.

  • Honey bees have been producing honey from flowering plants for about 10-20 million years.

  • The average honey bee worker makes 1/12 teaspoon of honey in her lifetime.

  • Honey bees contribute 8 to 10 billion dollars to the U.S. economy yearly.

  • Honey bees have four wings that are latched into pairs by hooks.

  • There are an estimated 200,000 beekeepers in the United States.

  • Honey bees are the only insects that produce food for humans.

  • The average summertime honey bee lives only about 28 to 35 days.

  • A honey bee visits between 50 and 100 flowers during one collection trip.

To learn more about the latest bee research we recommend visiting: https://www.life.illinois.edu/robinson/

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Honey Bees

Besides serving as pollinators, our bees provide honey that we collect each fall.

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